Exploratory study of the long-term footprint of deep brain stimulation on brain metabolism and neuroplasticity in an animal model of obesity Articles uri icon

authors

  • CASQUERO VEIGA, MARTA
  • Bueno Fernandez, Clara
  • ROMERO MIGUEL, LUIS DIEGO
  • LAMANNA RAMA, NICOLÁS
  • Nacher, Juan
  • DESCO MENENDEZ, MANUEL
  • SOTO MONTENEGRO, Mª LUISA

publication date

  • March 2021

start page

  • 5580

end page

  • 5591

issue

  • 1

volume

  • 11

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 2045-2322

abstract

  • Deep brain stimulation (DBS) is a powerful neurostimulation therapy proposed for the treatment of several neuropsychiatric disorders. However, DBS mechanism of action remains unclear, being its effects on brain dynamics of particular interest. Specifically, DBS reversibility is a major point of debate. Preclinical studies in obesity showed that the stimulation of the lateral hypothalamus (LH) and nucleus accumbens (NAcc), brain centers involved in satiety and reward circuits, are able to modulate the activity of brain structures impaired in this pathology. Nevertheless, the long-term persistence of this modulation after DBS withdrawal was unexplored. Here we examine the in vivo presence of such changes 1 month after LH- and NAcc-DBS, along with differences in synaptic plasticity, following an exploratory approach. Thus, both stimulated and non-stimulated animals with electrodes in the NAcc showed a common pattern of brain metabolism modulation, presumably derived from the electrodes' presence. In contrast, animals stimulated in the LH showed a relative metabolic invariance, and a reduction of neuroplasticity molecules, evidencing long-lasting neural changes. Our findings suggest that the reversibility or persistence of DBS modulation in the long-term depends on the selected DBS target. Therefore, the DBS footprint would be influenced by the stability achieved in the neural network involved during the stimulation.