Distribution of genotype network sizes in sequence-to-structure genotype - phenotype maps Articles uri icon

publication date

  • April 2017

issue

  • 129

volume

  • 14

International Standard Serial Number (ISSN)

  • 1742-5689

Electronic International Standard Serial Number (EISSN)

  • 1742-5662

abstract

  • An essential quantity to ensure evolvability of populations is the navigability of the genotype space. Navigability, understood as the ease with which alternative phenotypes are reached, relies on the existence of sufficiently large and mutually attainable genotype networks. The size of genotype networks (e.g. the number of RNA sequences folding into a particular secondary structure or the number of DNA sequences coding for the same protein structure) is astronomically large in all functional molecules investigated: an exhaustive experimental or computational study of all RNA folds or all protein structures becomes impossible even for moderately long sequences. Here, we analytically derive the distribution of genotype network sizes for a hierarchy of models which successively incorporate features of increasingly realistic sequence-to-structure genotype-phenotype maps. The main feature of these models relies on the characterization of each phenotype through a prototypical sequence whose sites admit a variable fraction of letters of the alphabet. Our models interpolate between two limit distributions: a power-law distribution, when the ordering of sites in the prototypical sequence is strongly constrained, and a lognormal distribution, as suggested for RNA, when different orderings of the same set of sites yield different phenotypes. Our main result is the qualitative and quantitative identification of those features of sequence-to-structure maps that lead to different distributions of genotype network sizes.

keywords

  • genotype - phenotype map; neutrality; rna; phenotype size; evolution; rna secondary structures; protein structures; neutral networks; evolution; model; adaptation; robustness; space; drift