Detection of mouse endogenous type B astrocytes migrating towards brain lesions Articles uri icon

authors

  • Elvira, Gema
  • Garcia, Isabel
  • Gallo, Juan
  • BENITO, MARINA
  • MONTESINOS SUAREZ DE LA VEGA, PAULA
  • HOLGADO MARTÍN, ESTHER
  • AYUSO SACIDO, ÁNGEL
  • Penades, Soledad
  • DESCO MENENDEZ, MANUEL
  • Silvia, Augusto
  • Garcia Sanz, Jose A

publication date

  • January 2015

start page

  • 114

end page

  • 129

issue

  • 1

volume

  • 14

international standard serial number (ISSN)

  • 1873-5061

electronic international standard serial number (EISSN)

  • 1876-7753

abstract

  • Neuroblasts represent the predominant migrating cell type in the adult mouse brain. There are, however, increasing evidences of migration of other neural precursors. This work aims at identifying in vivo endogenous early neural precursors, different from neuroblasts, able to migrate in response to brain injuries. The monoclonal antibody Nilo1, which unequivocally identifies type B astrocytes and embryonic radial glia, was coupled to magnetic glyconanoparticles (mGNPs). Here we show that Nilo1-mGNPs in combination with magnetic resonance imaging in living mice allowed the in vivo identification of endogenous type B astrocytes at their niche, as well as their migration to the lesion site in response to glioblastoma, demyelination, cryolesion or mechanical injuries. In addition, Nilo1(+) adult radial glia-like structures were identified at the lesion site a few hours after damage. For all damage models used, type B astrocyte migration was fast and orderly. Identification of Nilo1+ cells surrounding an induced glioblastoma was also possible after intraperitoneal injection of the antibody. This opens up the possibility of an early identification of the initial damage site(s) after brain insults, by the migration of type B astrocytes.

keywords

  • neural stem-cells; adult mammalian brain; central-nervous-system; radial glial-cells; subventricular zone; progenitor cells; neuronal migration; cortical-lesions; immature neurons; olfactory-bulb