Cerebral blood flow is an earlier indicator of perfusion abnormalities than cerebral blood volume in Alzheimer's disease Articles uri icon

authors

  • CALLE AURIOLES, MARIA LA
  • MATEOS PEREZ, JOSE MARIA
  • GUZMAN DE VILLORIA, JUAN A.
  • OLAZARÁN, JAVIER
  • CRUZ ORDUNA, ISABEL
  • ALEMAN GOMEZ, YASSER
  • MARTINO, MARÍA ELENA
  • DESCO MENENDEZ, MANUEL

publication date

  • April 2014

start page

  • 654

end page

  • 659

issue

  • 4

volume

  • 34

international standard serial number (ISSN)

  • 0271-678X

electronic international standard serial number (EISSN)

  • 1559-7016

abstract

  • The purpose of this study was to elucidate whether cerebral blood flow (CBF) can better characterize perfusion abnormalities in predementia stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD) than cerebral blood volume (CBV) and whether cortical atrophy is more associated with decreased CBV or with decreased CBF. We compared measurements of CBV, CBF, and mean cortical thickness obtained from magnetic resonance images in a group of healthy controls, patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) who converted to AD after 2 years of clinical follow-up (MCI-c), and patients with mild AD. A significant decrease in perfusion was detected in the parietal lobes of the MCI-c patients with CBF parametric maps but not with CBV maps. In the MCI-c group, a negative correlation between CBF values and cortical thickness in the right parahippocampal gyrus suggests an increase in CBF that depends on cortical atrophy in predementia stages of AD. Our study also suggests that CBF deficits appear before CBV deficits in the progression of AD, as CBV abnormalities were only detected at the AD stage, whereas CBF changes were already detected in the MCI stage. These results confirm the hypothesis that CBF is a more sensitive parameter than CBV for perfusion abnormalities in MCI-c patients. © 2014 ISCBFM All rights reserved.

keywords

  • alzheimer's disease; cerebral blood flow; cerebral blood volume; magnetic resonance imaging; mild cognitive impairment; perfusion imaging; aged; alzheimer disease; article; brain atrophy; brain blood flow; brain blood volume; brain perfusion; clinical article; controlled study; cortical thickness (brain); disease course; entorhinal cortex; female; follow up; fusiform gyrus; human; male; mild cognitive impairment; nuclear magnetic resonance imaging; parahippocampal gyrus; parietal lobe; pars opercularis; pars triangularis; precuneus; priority journal; prospective study; aged; alzheimer disease; blood flow velocity; blood volume; blood volume determination; cerebrovascular circulation; cerebrovascular disorders; early diagnosis; female; humans; image processing; computer-assisted; magnetic resonance imaging; male; mild cognitive impairment; neuropsychological tests; perfusion imaging; prospective studies