Differences in Maternal and Paternal Age between Schizophrenia and other Psychiatric Disorders Articles uri icon

authors

  • LÓPEZ CASTROMAN, JORGE
  • DELGADO GOMEZ, DAVID
  • CARBALLO-BELLOSO, J.
  • FERNANDEZ-NAVARRO, PABLO
  • PEREZ-RODRIGUEZ, M. MERCEDES
  • BASURTE VILLAMOR, IGNACIO
  • FERRE NAVARRETE, FRANCISCO
  • MORANT GINESTAR, CONSUELO
  • CURRIER, DIANNE
  • REYES TORRES, MARTA
  • NAVIO-ACOSTA, MERCEDES
  • SAIZ RUIZ, JERONIMO
  • JIMENEZ-ARRIERO, MIGUEL ANGEL
  • BACA GARCIA, ENRIQUE

publication date

  • February 2010

start page

  • 184

end page

  • 190

issue

  • 2-3

volume

  • 116

international standard serial number (ISSN)

  • 0920-9964

electronic international standard serial number (EISSN)

  • 1573-2509

abstract

  • Advanced parental age has been shown to increase offspring risk for a number of neuropsychiatric disorders including schizophrenia and Down's syndrome. Other psychiatric disorders have been less studied with
    respect to the effect of parental age on offspring risk. In this study
    we examine if advanced parental age increased risk for ICD-10 diagnoses.
    We hypothesized that advanced parental age would increase risk for
    offspring psychotic disorders and mental retardation but not other
    ICD-10 diagnoses. We examined follow-up data for 30,965 subjects treated
    in outpatient psychiatric facilities between 1980 and 2007. Subjects
    were younger than 18 years of age at their first outpatient visit. A
    comparison group was obtained from data on registered births in Spain
    from 1975. We compared parental age (maternal, paternal, combined)
    across diagnostic categories using ANOVA and logistic regression was
    used to estimate the risk of psychopathology in the offspring with
    advanced parental age (maternal, paternal, combined). Maternal and
    paternal ages were higher for subjects diagnosed with mental
    retardation. Risk for psychotic disorders showed a significant linear
    increase only with advancing maternal age, and not paternal age as is
    more often reported.